Poetry Map

We all know poems about Scotland but can the shape and nature of Scotland be drawn entirely in poetry? StAnza has set itself the challenge to see if this is the case. Find out more about the project and how to submit your poem by clicking here, or browse the poems using the map. Latest poems are listed below.

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 254: Burntisland

Wednesday 30 December 2015, 06:06
Burntisland Beach
 
The seas tumbling waves spread across the lands finish line,
Shaping it's golden edge into a crescent smile.
Stepping into the rumbling froth of the wave as it dies, 
Feel it pull the sand, your land away, to meet the horizon sky.
An open sea mounted onto an open sky,
Indeed it does feel good to be alive.
 
Eve Love

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 253: Kirkcowan

Wednesday 30 December 2015, 06:02
Dickie Wood
 
Like a gaudy hostess the cherry greets me,
a pink floral floosie
her arms wide in greeting,
then waves me on.
Daisies and forget-me-nots like cheering crowds welcome me
lining the well worn path up the drumlin.
The dykes that keep the curious cattle at bay
part up ahead to enfold the wood
and from here I can see other hilltops like this
each crowned with a brilliant blaze of beech.
But like a cat looking at a queen
I gaze over the village rooftops
to the grandeur of the distant Galloway hills.
The Merrick, Curleywee, Cairnsmore and Lammekin
all studiously ignore me.
 
Jayne Baldwin

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 252: East Calder

Wednesday 30 December 2015, 05:56
Homes for Sale
 
“Homes for Sale” thus read the sign
As diggers dig and bulldozers whine
Certain parties would not agree
The missel-thrush who once sat in the tree
Which was part of the woodland on this estate
Or the rabbits and hedgehogs
The moles and voles
Who used to reside here
In dry comfy holes
Or the little field-mouse
In his little field house
Such a pity – so unfair -
Defenceless wee creatures
In their harmless lair
Must now be evicted
As the hand of man
Takes over the land
And space is constricted.
 
Margaret Walker

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 251: Newhaven

Wednesday 30 December 2015, 05:53
Newhaven
 
Fish are gone, sun sets.
Empty market echoes still.
Bright yachts are lolling.
 
Antoine Bisset

 

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 250: Grangemouth

Wednesday 30 December 2015, 05:50
The Metal Jungle
 
It was a dull, bleak day,
With  the refinery hiding in the mist.
 
Lit up at night like fairyland-
Disneyland on Forth.
 
The burning waste gas, like a beacon,
Reflected in the low cloud base-
The sky was on fire.
 
Frozen vapour columns from cooling towers,
Hold up the winter sky.
 
Towers and pipes everywhere,
Like an upturned brush-
And the eeriness of an empty chemical plant at night.
 
William Ballantine

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 249: Largs

Wednesday 30 December 2015, 05:41
Largs
 
I came to Largs in awe a sunder, bought a flat then began tae wonder,
Whit is this place they ah speak about, I bought a bike tae gae in find out
My, oh my, whit a bonnie toun, I saw my sel gae’in roon an aroon,
Fae the lake  tae the marina nae boats tae plenty,
An inbetween a the sights are heftie
 
Tall church spires just like the cones oh ice cream just tae chill yer bones
N’ that wind which hails fae nae’whaur just go inside and say a wee praur
 
I wiz working then, ah ower the place, fae largs tae Tireee and auld Rothesay
I didnae hae time to enjoy it ah!, but now im retired on the Gogo burr
 
I watch the watter just trickling by in the summer when its awfy dry
In the winter this year a weather bomb came so ah run awa and jumped on a plane
So am in Tunisia the day and saw this project fir poems tae play
I thoucht well, well, lets just see whit comes tae mind about old An Leargaidh
 
Catherine

 

 

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map