Poetry Map

We all know poems about Scotland but can the shape and nature of Scotland be drawn entirely in poetry? StAnza has set itself the challenge to see if this is the case. Find out more about the project and how to submit your poem by clicking here, or browse the poems using the map. Latest poems are listed below.

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 237: Dunfermline

Thursday 5 November 2015, 19:55

The Green Knight from Dunfermline Toune

 

He said he was from Dunfermline.

Dunfermline ?

I googled it right away

and there was this old king there

drinking the blood-red wine.

No, reader, it wasn’t exactly as in the medieval ballad.

No doomed knights for me.

He is a miner’s son, a soldier.

Yes, reader, I married him !

Each other day I go along Queensferry Road to small Asda.

The town hall clock tower looks like a green knight.

Wee fast food outlets are packed – school crowds are out for lunch.

Flocks of hungry black birds in their striped ties.

They grow so quickly. Then disappear.

Only a single plastic fork is left on the pavement now.

The toune like an ancient sleepy tortoise

rests between the hills.

The one-eyed Green Knight

standing guard forever.

 

Zofia Badura Neilson

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 236: Luing

Wednesday 4 November 2015, 22:47

Eco-logic: A Haiku

An ancient fence post
Capped by lichens
provided the soil
For a bonsai blaeberry bonnet.

 

James McCarthy

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 235: Caithness

Sunday 1 November 2015, 15:44

Caithness

If I could run headless through the barley fields
I would swim the green tide of land
to Watten, say, or maybe Bower
in the flat converted boglands
where our generations found their form

I would run headless then from steading
to steading, from barn to barn
starbright in the stables & milking sheds
my headless head full of the smells of growth
& silage, ah sweet temptress life

you have strew the stone anvils
of our northern tapestry with many gods
on our tongues sit Thor & Odin
behind our eyes bleed Christ & Columba
not often as the planet spins

will the darkness glitter like this

 

George Gunn
Previously published in Winter Barley (Chapman 2005)

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 234: Strathcanaird

Saturday 31 October 2015, 15:37

Planting Potatoes during Chernobyl

The seed went in two days
before the clouds of Chernobyl
Shiva-danced over the Strath.
We joked about tubers
glowing in the dark.
It rained for six weeks.

The leaves grew to lovely sheen.
Tiny flowers lured bees and butterflies.
Roots swelled Edzell Blues, skins of livid heather.
Kerr’s Pinks, soft carnation hue, marble-fleshed.

All perfect, as new potatoes.
Leave them for maincrop?
Eat and run? Dig before
the roots turn to slush, cells run riot?

Let them grow.
Death and potatoes
go a long way back in my family.
Our old Irish men in North America
would not risk potatoes again.
They planted maize
because the sun could cure what the soil could not.

In that newer world, death was above ground,
in the clear living light.

 

Tom Bryan

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 233: Mull

Saturday 31 October 2015, 15:35

Kilninian

Some look east
for mystic inspiration,
why must I stand
enthralled
on a western shore
gazing at the Atlantic?

I come from the west,
from the sea.
When coracle and pilgrim
nudged the limpet-blistered rocks
I was there,
my long hair wet,
I twisted my hands
around a cross.

I knew the water then,
the foam lapped at my mouth.
I stood first on the west shore
waiting for others.
I waited so long,
while the east came west,
looking for me.

Lis Lee

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 232: Easdale

Friday 30 October 2015, 15:34

Unearthing Easdale

Men toiled to keep rain out.
Black slate split from unyielding ground.
Working for fools in the promise of gold,
to keep their own safe from Atlantic cold.

Left toothless,
Your slate is clean.
Now silenced by the sound
Of a Duchess and Countess *
Marking time.
Waiting by a hearth-stone
For their history to unfold.

 

Hazel Buchan Cameron

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map