Maja Lee Langvad

Maja Lee Langvad (b. 1980 in Seoul) is a writer, translator and editor who lives in Copenhagen. She is the author of several books including Find Holger Danske (Find Holger Dane) and HUN ER VRED—Et vidnesbyrd om transnational adoption (SHE IS ANGRY—A testimony of transnational adoption). Her books explore themes such as transnational adoption, national identity, racism, kinship and the act of writing. She has translated Fragebogen (Questionnaires) by the Swiss author Max Frisch into Danish and she is currently translating Baby Precious Always Shines by the American author Gertrude Stein and her partner Alice B. Toklas. She is the co-editor of the Nordic literary magazine Kritiker.

leelangvad.dk

Photo: Isak Hoffmeyer

Events

Breakfast at the Poetry Café: Translation »

Link for Live Streaming of this event.

https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/livevideo/one/

This event and the other two Poetry Breakfast events at this year’s festival will be webcast. Please note these are live streaming webcasts, we are not recording the events, so you can only watch them while they are live; also you will not find anything at the link above until the events actually begin. 

Poets and translators discuss translation and familial languages

Sun 8 March | 10:00 - 11:00 | £5/£4 | Byre Theatre, Abbey Street, Studio Theatre

Border Crossings »

Lynne Hjelmgaard, Maja Lee Langvad

Sun 8 March | 14:15 - 15:15 | £4.50/£3.50 | Undercroft, St John's House, South Street

Poem

This is the Danelaw:*

1. Do not think you are a Dane because you were born in Denmark.

2.  Do not think you are a Dane because you speak fluent Danish.

3.  Do not think you are a Dane because you are a Danish citizen.

4.  Do not think you are a Dane because you live in Denmark.

5.  Do not think you are a Dane because you respect the laws of Denmark.

6.  Do not think you are a Dane because your grandparents think you are.

7.  Do not think you are a Dane because you fly the Danish flag in your garden.

8.  Do not think you are a Dane because you call some people New Danes.

9.  Do not think you are a Dane because you would die for Denmark.

10. Do not think you are a Dane because you feel Danish.

 

Maja Lee Langvad, tr. Barbara J. Haveland

From Find Holger Dankse (Gyldendal, 2006)

*The ‘Danelaw’ refers to the Jante Law which is a commonly used expression in Scandinavia. The Jante Law was invented by the Danish-Norwegian author Aksel Sandemose. In his novel A Fugitive Crosses his Tracks (1933) he states ten commandments that describe the Scandinavian smalltown mentality where everyone tries to keep each other down. Those who stand out from the crowd are treated with suspicion and coldness.