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Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 370

Friday 22 January 2021, 15:55

Colours Of Glory

60,000 congregationers
gather at 3 pm
for Saturday devotions
and sometimes Sunday or Midweek services
at high noon or 7.45 of an evening
this is the place the faithful come to worship
the skills of those who wear the colours of glory
this is where we learn chapter and verse
the book of our story
the history and identity that moulds us
in to who we are and will remain
throughout the days of our lives
this is where we learned of lions who roared
in the heat of the Lisbon sun
and how we thought after defeating the might of Leeds
we would be crowned kings of Europe
for the second time in four years
till Feyenoord taught us the valuable lesson
that complacency kills dreams
in the home of the team we defeated
when we brought the big cup home to Scottish shores
this is so much more
than a sporting arena
it is and has been home to the artist, the thinker the dreamer
and brave and courageous leaders
this is not just a theatre of dreams
as some clubs claim their stadium to be
this is a temple where icons and legends were made
as Swedes, Slovakians, Bulgarians and Japanese
joined local bhoys to become heroes in the hoops
it's a place where experience meets youth
where generations have gathered together
to cheer the Celts and break the bread of friendship
share it with strangers and with kin
and win lose or draw to come home to paradise
to take our place in the palace of champions
as we answer the call to worship

Gayle Smith

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 369

Wednesday 20 January 2021, 17:31

You can't eat a view

That's what my mom said. Brochview,
where I grew up. Halfway up the steepest hill,
blattered by sea gales, penned in by nosy sheep,
with salt-crust windows that eyed that broch
in all its solid, blocked squatness.

Smug old pile of stone is what it was.

And I a weaver's daughter, and holding
the requisite ever-knitting mother. Tourists
had expectations of me – oh my days just gazing
at the cliffs and contours of that island
that belonged to that broch.

We all belonged to that broch.

Sure enough, a view fills bellies not at all.
The bank took the view and the house away,
though I'd already walked out of shot, long gone
somewhere less picturesque. Still, if I'd known
when I left I'd never look back,

I might've stopped at a window one last time.

Maxine Rose Munro

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 368

Tuesday 19 January 2021, 12:02

Treesbank Estate

These woods were dark and deep and long
I would walk through them, and sing a song
Though the path would become steeper
I never worried about the wood-keeper.
Trees trees trees surrounding me like
A green cathedral made me feel free
To enjoy a bounty here on earth
That dear place I knew since my birth.
The birds were soft, the birds were loud
I came here to escape the crowd
Light soft filtering through the leaves
And shadows that surrounded me.
The green, the trees that fallen lay
The dawning light, the darkened day
Times of year, the lengthening spring
Soon the summer days would bring
A sense of love and peace and joy
No other humans there to annoy
Alone and yet not alone I see
Those woodlands they have set me free.

Alex Frew

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 367

Monday 18 January 2021, 11:59

North of the Border

It’s been thirty years. Next time I come
it may be to Crieff.
I will try to find Sauchie Road
and look out for Torleum View

like searching for a childhood home
I’ve forgotten the way to.
I won’t be able to go in,
its new occupants won’t welcome me,

I fear they may already be there.
You couldn’t come to the station
to meet me from the train
in your purple car as you did in Burnley.

Perhaps I will stay in the B&B
you were going to book for me
when you could afford it
and I could afford the rail fare.

Peter Donnelly

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 366

Sunday 17 January 2021, 10:28
Robbing Burns
 
Springtime in Angus
Halcyon days for youth of Britain.
Bees en pursuit of heather
Tadpoles metamorphosing in burns of
Torrent down to a trickle
In just one generation
Through dens towards Kirrie
Over flat sandstone pebbles, caressed
By river jelly lichen
Under boreal woodland
The alder in leafage
Shady horsetail, purple orchid
Four leafed herb-paris, flowering
In the domain Cortachy.
Water drying up year on year.
Is this global warming?
 
 
Alun Robert

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Make it New for 2021!

Saturday 16 January 2021, 17:03

StAnza 2021 imageToday we’d like to give a shout out about some exciting things which will be new for StAnza 2021 - and yes, there’s quite a lot of new stuff. We’ve been keen to ensure that, as well as finding online ways to platform as many as possible of our regular StAnza events at our online festival in March, we also seize the opportunities of an online festival to offer new ways of experiencing poetry – and also to offer poetry offline at a distance.

First up there’s our Poets at Home events, in which we’re taking advantage of the fact that everyone’s filming from home to ask poets to introduce us to their writing process and setup, with Malika Booker, Sasha Dugdale, Ella Frears, Caroline Bird and Will Harris.

Also new for 2021 we’re bringing you poetry to listen to at bedtime with Between the Covers. Unwind at the end of the festival day with audio from Rachel Long, Larry Butler and Sheila Templeton.

We’re thrilled to be teaming up with some of our favourite podcasts for a new take on our Past & Present events for 2021, working with the Dead Ladies Show, FreeVers(e) and New Caribbean Voices from Peepal Press to learn about a range of poets who continue to inspire.

In another new partnership this year, we’ll have a children’s poetry trail created by beloved children’s author Jane Yolen at St Andrews Botanic Gardens. If covid regulations permit in March, for St Andrews locals this will be in the gardens, but we’ll also have an online version.

Watch out for news on Dial-A-Poem, which we will launch soon, then call up our poetry hotline to hear our poem of the week in the run-up to the festival – and if you’re lucky during StAnza 2021, you’ll get a personal reading from one of our operators, Catherine Wilson and Katie Hale.

Have you ever coveted the poetry window stickers to be seen throughout St Andrews over StAnza? This year for our Poetry Windows installation we’ll be making small self-stick window poems, so that you can adorn your favourite window with a poem for a while – they are self-cling and easy to remove.

We will also have Postcards to Poetry on postcards which we’d be happy to post to you, or to someone you nominate. The window stickers and postcards will be subject to supplies so if you’d one of either, be sure to email in quick. We’ll share more information about that in February.

Windows, or rather views from them, were also the inspiration for our project WindowSwap. Inspired by the online project of the same name, we invited twelve poets around the world to send us a photograph of the view from their window, and commissioned them to write a poem responding to the view from another poet’s window which we sent to them. The results have started to trickle in and are brightening our days here. We hope they’ll do the same for you in March.

Last but not least, we’re really excited about the poetry games we’ve commissioned for StAnza 2021 – from Calum Roger and Hannah Raymond-Cox. Check them out for a poetry tour of St Andrews, or to explore the parallels between poetry and retro-style video games.

Watch out for more news about a more traditional Past & Present session, plus this years readings, annual StAnza lecture and our Poetry Cafe sessions, and all our digital installations.

Categories: News
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