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Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 372

Thursday 28 January 2021, 15:14

Scotland’s Honours

In 1651 England’s favourite son
chapped at Dunnottar Castle
door, seeking the Honours and
so much more. 

September to June 1652, that
Castle held out till Cromwell was
blue. The Regalia he sought had
been ghosted away and England
still rues it to this very day.

By stealth and great bravery the
honours were saved and buried
under a slab at a pulpit’s face.
In Kinneff’s old Church there it
lay that day, until 1660 when a
new King once more held sway.

When Charles II took to the throne,
Minister James Grainger took the
honours home. 

To Edinburgh Castle they went that
day, there once more to be proudly
displayed. The oldest honours that stand in this land, saved for the
nation by Dunnottar’s hands.

Kit Duddy

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 371

Tuesday 26 January 2021, 11:33

Magnus the Mighty

Magnus the mighty stands,
spear and shield in his hands,
surveying all of Largs.
Not since 1263
did mighty Vikings see
our chip shops and our bars.
But Magnus stays his lust.
Stand still and strong he must,
withstanding every gust,
lest he should turn to rust.
Magnus of Largs.

Cara L McKee

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Time to be creative!

Sunday 24 January 2021, 19:18

Looking for some prompts for creativity?  Here you'll find not one, not two but three suggestions! Find out more about (1) Resolve to Make it New, (2) The Art of Energy and (3) Windows on poetry. 

Firstly, this year, Fife Contemporary’s collaboration with StAnza Poetry Festival 2021 is an online exhibition (Resolve to Make it New), and we’re looking for your participation! If you’ve spent some of the weeks and months of lockdown (any of them!) mending something that you thought was past saving, or writing down your thoughts about how you’ve come to realise the importance of ‘making new’, please email Fife Contemporary (mail@fcac.co.uk):

• a poem of up to 20 lines, OR

• up to 3 images of your renewed object with up to 100 words of description

Please put Make it New in the subject line of your email.

StAnza Poetry Festival 2021 runs from 6-14 March 2021, but Resolve to Make it New has just gone live now, and will remain on the website after the end of the festival. Please send in your poem or images/text as soon as you can! Fife Contemporary will continue to add them to the website until the festival begins.

https://www.fcac.co.uk/exhibitions/resolve-to-make-it-new/

Next, Energy Ethics are inviting submissions by 10 February for their event The Art of Energy | Energy Ethics on the following theme:

“How would you artistically conceptualise our current energy predicament where we need to balance energy demand with concern about human-driven climate change? How can we make sense of the entanglement of life with energy in the past, present and future?”

They are seeking art submissions of the following types/categories, and are offering cash awards for the top three finalists (£1,000, £250, £150) across categories:

  • Visual (photography, printmaking, drawing, painting, mixed media; maximum 5 images)
  • Short Film & Media (video, filmmaking, performance, maximum 5 minutes in length)
  • Sound Art (maximum 5 minutes in length)
  • Spoken word, poems, written submissions and short essays (Maximum 800 words)

You can find more information at Art of Energy | Energy Ethics and the deadline for submissions is 10 February 2021 at 23:59 (GMT), and good luck to all those who submit.

And if that’s not for you, how about writing a lockdown window view poem? For our WindowSwap project at StAnza we’ve commissioned 12 poets from around the world to swap views from their window and write about the view they’re sent. Our project was inspired by the wonderful online app, WindowSwap (window-swap.com). At a time when around the world so many of us are in lockdown, we’re mostly experiencing the non-virtual world through the views from our windows, and how wonderful that the Window Swap app allows us to enjoy the views from so many other windows.

If any of the views you see – from your own window, from one of the window views on the Window Swap app, or even perhaps from the window view sent to you by a friend – inspire you to write a poem, we’d love to see it. If you’d like to share it with us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, please use the hashtag #windowswap2021, and you can tag us at @StAnzaPoetry (Twitter), stanzapoetry (Instagram) or stanzapoetry (Facebook).

Happy writing!

Categories: News

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 370

Friday 22 January 2021, 15:55

Colours Of Glory

60,000 congregationers
gather at 3 pm
for Saturday devotions
and sometimes Sunday or Midweek services
at high noon or 7.45 of an evening
this is the place the faithful come to worship
the skills of those who wear the colours of glory
this is where we learn chapter and verse
the book of our story
the history and identity that moulds us
in to who we are and will remain
throughout the days of our lives
this is where we learned of lions who roared
in the heat of the Lisbon sun
and how we thought after defeating the might of Leeds
we would be crowned kings of Europe
for the second time in four years
till Feyenoord taught us the valuable lesson
that complacency kills dreams
in the home of the team we defeated
when we brought the big cup home to Scottish shores
this is so much more
than a sporting arena
it is and has been home to the artist, the thinker the dreamer
and brave and courageous leaders
this is not just a theatre of dreams
as some clubs claim their stadium to be
this is a temple where icons and legends were made
as Swedes, Slovakians, Bulgarians and Japanese
joined local bhoys to become heroes in the hoops
it's a place where experience meets youth
where generations have gathered together
to cheer the Celts and break the bread of friendship
share it with strangers and with kin
and win lose or draw to come home to paradise
to take our place in the palace of champions
as we answer the call to worship

Gayle Smith

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 369

Wednesday 20 January 2021, 17:31

You can't eat a view

That's what my mom said. Brochview,
where I grew up. Halfway up the steepest hill,
blattered by sea gales, penned in by nosy sheep,
with salt-crust windows that eyed that broch
in all its solid, blocked squatness.

Smug old pile of stone is what it was.

And I a weaver's daughter, and holding
the requisite ever-knitting mother. Tourists
had expectations of me – oh my days just gazing
at the cliffs and contours of that island
that belonged to that broch.

We all belonged to that broch.

Sure enough, a view fills bellies not at all.
The bank took the view and the house away,
though I'd already walked out of shot, long gone
somewhere less picturesque. Still, if I'd known
when I left I'd never look back,

I might've stopped at a window one last time.

Maxine Rose Munro

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 368

Tuesday 19 January 2021, 12:02

Treesbank Estate

These woods were dark and deep and long
I would walk through them, and sing a song
Though the path would become steeper
I never worried about the wood-keeper.
Trees trees trees surrounding me like
A green cathedral made me feel free
To enjoy a bounty here on earth
That dear place I knew since my birth.
The birds were soft, the birds were loud
I came here to escape the crowd
Light soft filtering through the leaves
And shadows that surrounded me.
The green, the trees that fallen lay
The dawning light, the darkened day
Times of year, the lengthening spring
Soon the summer days would bring
A sense of love and peace and joy
No other humans there to annoy
Alone and yet not alone I see
Those woodlands they have set me free.

Alex Frew

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map
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