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Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 367

Monday 18 January 2021, 11:59

North of the Border

It’s been thirty years. Next time I come
it may be to Crieff.
I will try to find Sauchie Road
and look out for Torleum View

like searching for a childhood home
I’ve forgotten the way to.
I won’t be able to go in,
its new occupants won’t welcome me,

I fear they may already be there.
You couldn’t come to the station
to meet me from the train
in your purple car as you did in Burnley.

Perhaps I will stay in the B&B
you were going to book for me
when you could afford it
and I could afford the rail fare.

Peter Donnelly

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 366

Sunday 17 January 2021, 10:28
Robbing Burns
 
Springtime in Angus
Halcyon days for youth of Britain.
Bees en pursuit of heather
Tadpoles metamorphosing in burns of
Torrent down to a trickle
In just one generation
Through dens towards Kirrie
Over flat sandstone pebbles, caressed
By river jelly lichen
Under boreal woodland
The alder in leafage
Shady horsetail, purple orchid
Four leafed herb-paris, flowering
In the domain Cortachy.
Water drying up year on year.
Is this global warming?
 
 
Alun Robert

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Make it New for 2021!

Saturday 16 January 2021, 17:03

StAnza 2021 imageToday we’d like to give a shout out about some exciting things which will be new for StAnza 2021 - and yes, there’s quite a lot of new stuff. We’ve been keen to ensure that, as well as finding online ways to platform as many as possible of our regular StAnza events at our online festival in March, we also seize the opportunities of an online festival to offer new ways of experiencing poetry – and also to offer poetry offline at a distance.

First up there’s our Poets at Home events, in which we’re taking advantage of the fact that everyone’s filming from home to ask poets to introduce us to their writing process and setup, with Malika Booker, Sasha Dugdale, Ella Frears, Caroline Bird and Will Harris.

Also new for 2021 we’re bringing you poetry to listen to at bedtime with Between the Covers. Unwind at the end of the festival day with audio from Rachel Long, Larry Butler and Sheila Templeton.

We’re thrilled to be teaming up with some of our favourite podcasts for a new take on our Past & Present events for 2021, working with the Dead Ladies Show, FreeVers(e) and New Caribbean Voices from Peepal Press to learn about a range of poets who continue to inspire.

In another new partnership this year, we’ll have a children’s poetry trail created by beloved children’s author Jane Yolen at St Andrews Botanic Gardens. If covid regulations permit in March, for St Andrews locals this will be in the gardens, but we’ll also have an online version.

Watch out for news on Dial-A-Poem, which we will launch soon, then call up our poetry hotline to hear our poem of the week in the run-up to the festival – and if you’re lucky during StAnza 2021, you’ll get a personal reading from one of our operators, Catherine Wilson and Katie Hale.

Have you ever coveted the poetry window stickers to be seen throughout St Andrews over StAnza? This year for our Poetry Windows installation we’ll be making small self-stick window poems, so that you can adorn your favourite window with a poem for a while – they are self-cling and easy to remove.

We will also have Postcards to Poetry on postcards which we’d be happy to post to you, or to someone you nominate. The window stickers and postcards will be subject to supplies so if you’d one of either, be sure to email in quick. We’ll share more information about that in February.

Windows, or rather views from them, were also the inspiration for our project WindowSwap. Inspired by the online project of the same name, we invited twelve poets around the world to send us a photograph of the view from their window, and commissioned them to write a poem responding to the view from another poet’s window which we sent to them. The results have started to trickle in and are brightening our days here. We hope they’ll do the same for you in March.

Last but not least, we’re really excited about the poetry games we’ve commissioned for StAnza 2021 – from Calum Roger and Hannah Raymond-Cox. Check them out for a poetry tour of St Andrews, or to explore the parallels between poetry and retro-style video games.

Watch out for more news about a more traditional Past & Present session, plus this years readings, annual StAnza lecture and our Poetry Cafe sessions, and all our digital installations.

Categories: News

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 365

Thursday 14 January 2021, 12:31

Gales are dialect raps

A kettle boiled gale force
Pours sea over the dock
With bones spit from a main course
Hour glasses level rocks

Boats traverse the trails of shoals
Upon layers of maps
Isles are tins, cups and bowls
Gales are dialect raps 

Waves lather stone to soap
Nets are spun like webs
A coral kaleidoscope
Strobes floodlight the ebb

Chris Tait

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Dig It! – StAnza 2021 Creative Writing Opportunity

Tuesday 12 January 2021, 11:33

Dig It StAnza creative writing op imageWe are delighted to be partnering Dig It! in this great paid commission opportunity for a poet based in Scotland.  This is a call out for applications by 21 January. Read on for more information, including on the payment offered.

Dig It! is a hub for Scottish archaeology with a Scotland-wide network of heritage organisations, museums and archaeological groups who are looking for looking for a Scotland-based poet to produce a short poem inspired by an archaeological site or artefact in Scotland (from a list they will provide) and to create an mp3 recording of them reciting the poem.

The poem will be writteto coincide with StAnza 2021, Scotland’s International Poetry Festival which takes place from 6 – 14 March, and will reflect one or both of our festival’s themes; Make It New’ and ‘No Rhyme nor Reason’.

They welcome applications from poets working in any language, including but not limited to Scots, Gaelic, and English, as long as an English translation is also provided by the  commissioned poet.

The successful applicant will work remotely with Dig It! (a small team based in Edinburgh) and one of the archaeologists who worked on one of their sites. They will provide the details to help you bring the story to life (such as imagesdescriptions and historical details). Dig It! are keen to develop the piece in partnership with the commissioned poet and follow their creative lead as they bring a fresh approach to how the past is depicted. 

Dig It! particularly encourage applications from Asian writers, LGBTQIA+ writers, non-binary writersdisabled writersBlack writers and writers from the African and/or Afro-Caribbean diaspora (including mixed-race/multiple-heritage) who are based in Scotland. Marginalised communities have often been excluded from recreations of the past and Dig It! want to showcase different perspectives on Scottish archaeology.

No prior knowledge is required. Dig It! are interested in a creative response to the materials they will  provide. An interest in archaeology is welcome but not essential.

The full payment offered is £250 (including VAT) and the application deadline is 12 noon on Thursday 21 January 2021. More details and application information can be found here: StAnza 2021 – Creative Writing Brief

Categories: News

Poetry Map of Scotland: poem no. 364

Monday 11 January 2021, 09:33

Cliff at Noss

They say this wet rock reaches
as far down into the sea
as the cliff stands dry above.

Staring into the drowning dark,
under the glassy slip and swell
of its elastic skin, I see what
could be plankton, ocean-drifters,
named for the wandering planets.
Or is it no more than a fine land-dust,
endlessly falling through unbordered black?

Does the cliff drop sheer, a mirror
picture of its twin in upper air?
Or is it loose, stepped and slabbed,
bottoming in a shifting rubble field,
tide-stirred, worked smooth by storms?

Gannets, saffron-smudged,
their tails stiff as whittled wood,
bank on ink-dipped wings, hang
as if strung on wires, plunge
in arrow-showers, seeing what
I cannot see: the silver-flashing
shoals, rock-anchored urchins
and soft incurled anemones.

Each bird rises from its narrow
ledge, dives, a sea-forager,
returns and dives again,
water and air its single element.

Imogen Forster

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map
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